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  • Earn 1 Reward Points
    $1.00
    • Price is per piece – order as many as you want!
    • Delivered at its peak level of freshness
    • About the size of an egg, kiwifruit is wrapped in a russet-brown thin skin with short rather stiff hairs. The kaleidoscope-like almost glistening emerald green firm pulp is dotted with a large amount of dark nearly black tiny edible seeds that create this fruit’s characteristic interior starburst pattern. Sometimes the flesh may be yellow, brownish or off-white. Sweet tart with a slightly acidic edge, this decorative fruit’s succulent flavor is mainly sweet
    • Kiwifruit is available from California during the winter months. New Zealand kiwifruit is available in spring and supplies arrive from Chile during the summer months
    • According to the California Kiwifruit Commission, kiwi fruit were the fastest-growing fruit in sales and distribution from 1987 to 1995
    • Kiwifruit is rich in vitamin C, having ten times more than the equal weight of a lemon. Two fruits have almost twice the vitamin C of an orange and more potassium than a comparable serving of bananas. High in fiber, it also offers vitamin A, Vitamin E, calcium and iron. Credit goes to all those little black seeds, as they act much like grains, providing lots of nutrition
    • Puree; enhance juices and beverages. Even though the skin is edible, the fruit is usually peeled. Slice for garnish. Containing a meat-tenderizing enzyme, place sliced peels with some flesh attached directly on meat; marinate thirty minutes for each inch of the meat’s thickness. To make a kiwifruit salsa, blend four peeled kiwis, one teaspoon minced jalapeño pepper, one tablespoon orange juice, one tablespoon chopped fresh mint and a pinch of salt. Serve with grilled swordfish, grilled poultry and roast pork
    • Bananas, berries, mangoes, strawberries, raspberries and oranges are especially partial to kiwifruit. To store, refrigerate ripe fruit up to ten days. Refrigerated unripe fruit lasts up to one month
    • The French word, souris vegetale, for this fruit translates to “vegetable mouse”
    • Native to the Yangtze River Valley of northern China and Zhejiang Province on the coast of eastern China, this fruit was first grown commercially in New Zealand. England received their very first kiwifruit shipment in 1953. Not frost-tolerant, the vigorous woody twining vine or climbing shrubby plants require a long growing season. Only fully dormant plants can survive temperatures around ten degrees Fahrenheit. The rambling vines are capable of stretching to cover an area ten to fifteen feet wide, eighteen to twenty-four feet long and nine to twelve feet high. Producing deep green leathery-textured oval to round leaves that can grow seven to ten inches in diameter, fragrant one to two inch wide white to cream colored flowers appear in the leaf axils. In the United States, California produces about ninety-nine percent of the nation’s kiwifruit supply
  • Earn 1 Reward Points
    $1.75
    • Price quoted is per piece – buy as many as you need!
    • Delivered to you at its peak level of freshness
    • Apples continue to ripen after they’re picked. Store them in the refrigerator to prevent over-ripening and mushiness
    • Gala apples are covered in a thin yellow to orange skin, highlighted with pink to red stripes that vary in hue dependent upon the apples maturity. Their dense flesh is creamy yellow and crisp, offering a mildly sweet flavor and flora aroma. Gala’s that are allowed to reach the peak of their sweetness on the tree will have a deeper red hue and a slightly sweeter flavor
    • Grown in both the southern and northern hemisphere, Gala Apples are available year-round
    • A cross between Golden Delicious and Kidd’s Orange Red, the Gala apple is currently one of the most extensively grown apples in the world. It has an impressive lineage, being related as well to both the Delicious and Cox Orange Pippin varieties. It is also parent to several varieties such as the Jazz and Pacific Rose
    • Gala apples are a great snacking fruit as they are low in calories, high in water content and offer a fair amount of vitamins A, C and B. They also contain a dietary fiber known as pectin, which has been shown to lower cholesterol levels and help prevent heart attacks. They also contain trace amounts of boron, which has been touted for its ability to help build strong bones
    • The delicate flavor and texture of the Gala apple shines in fresh preparations. They are perfect for use in fruit, green and chopped salads. Add diced gala to fruit salsas and chutneys. Slice and add to burgers, paninis and crostinis. Their sweet flavor becomes milder when cooked making them perfect in baked preparations when paired with stronger flavored apples such a Granny Smith, Arkansas Black, Pippin and Mutsu
    • The flavor of pears, winter squash, onions, pecans, turkey, curry, brie, cheddar and Swiss cheese complement Gala apples
    • Gala apples were developed in New Zealand in 1934 by apple breeder J.H. Kidd. Commercial distribution began in both Europe and North America in the 1980’s. Gala apples grow well in both warm and cold climates and as result can be found growing in apple growing regions across the globe
  • Earn 2 Reward Points
    $2.00
    • Price is per piece – buy as many as you want!
    • Delivered at their peak level of freshness
    • Granny Smith apples have a bright green skin that is often speckled with faint white lenticels (spots). Medium to large in size and round in shape, they are a firm and juicy apple with thick skin. Their flesh is bright white and crisp in texture with a tart, acidic, yet subtly sweet flavor. Granny Smith apples grown in colder climates will often take on a yellow to pink blush
    • Granny Smith apples are available year-round.
    • A member of the rose family (Rosaceae), the exact parentage of Granny Smith apples is unknown, but they are believed to be a relative of the French crab apple. Most apples are green when immature and then when ripe take on shades of red, pink and yellow. Granny Smith apples, however maintain their green hue both when immature and ripe
    • Granny Smith apples are high in cell repairing antioxidants. They are also a good source of soluble fiber, which has been proven to help lower cholesterol, control weight, and regulate blood sugar. Granny Smith apples contain vitamins A and C, as well as a trace amount of iron, most of which is located in their skin
    • Granny Smith apples are often used in baking because of their high acidity and ability to hold their shape when cooked. Try baked into sweet or savory pies, tarts, or meat pastries; add to savory bread stuffing, risotto or potato pancakes. Their sweet-tart flavor is a great addition to soups, smoothies and sauces. Because they are slow to brown when cut, they are perfect diced and added to fresh preparations such as salads and salsas or sliced and paired with cheese.Granny Smith apples were discovered in Australia in the 1860’s, as a chance seedling in the compost pile on the orchard of Maria Ann Smith. Granny Smith apples were first introduced commercially to the United Kingdom in the 1930’s and later to North America in the 1970’s. They were one of the first varieties of apple widely available in supermarkets as their thick skin and excellent storing qualities made them suitable for shipping. Today Granny Smith apples grow in Australia, Europe, New Zealand, South America and the United States. They tend to ripen best in warmer climates where they get a significant amount of sunshine
  • Earn 1 Reward Points
    $1.50
    • Price is per piece – buy as many as you want!
    • Delivered at their peak level of freshness
    • Red Delicious apples are bright to deep red in color, oftentimes speckled with faint white lenticels (spots). Its creamy white flesh is slightly crisp and dense offering a mildly sweet flavor and slightly flora aroma
    • Red Delicious apples are available year-round
    • The Red Delicious apple is one of the most well know commercially grown apples. Throughout the years many different varieties have been developed in order to make improvements to the color of the apple as well as make it more suitable for travel and increase its shelf life. Some argue that this has had a negative impact on the flavor and lead to a decline in market demand for the Red Delicious
    • Red Delicious apples offer a small amount of vitamin A and vitamin C and have only a trace of sodium. They contain pectin, a beneficial fiber that has been shown to help promote healthy cholesterol levels and slow glucose metabolism in diabetics. Red Delicious apples are also higher in antioxidants than many other apple varieties, most of which is contained in their skin
    • Red Delicious apples are best used in fresh preparations, as their flesh does not hold up well when cooked. Add to green, fruit and chopped salads. Use as an edible garnish on sandwiches, quesadillas and burgers. Since their flesh breaks down easily they can be successfully slow cooked and pureed to make sauces and soups. Their flavor pairs well with cinnamon, cheddar cheese, horseradish, chard, cherries, mustard and pecans
    • The Red Delicious apple was discovered as a chance seedling in 1872 on the Iowa farm of Jesse Hiatt. He marketed it under the name Hawkeye and eventually sold the rights to a fruit company known as Stark Brothers. The apple was first renamed Delicious and later on when Stark Brothers discovered another apple and named it Golden Delicious they renamed the Delicious, Red Delicious. The Red Delicious apple saw tremendous commercial success between 1940 and the late 1980’s, with the bulk of the supply coming out of Washington State