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    • Carrots can be shades of orange, yellow, purple and white. Their flesh is snappy and crisp. Their flavors, quintessentially earthy and sweet with notes of celery. Though carrots are most often found trimmed of their thin, dill-like foliage, their greens are equally edible, with herbaceous carrot and parsley undertones
    • Jumbo carrots are available year-round
    • Carrots, botanical name Daucus Carota subs. sativus, belong to the Umbelliferae family along with parsnips, fennel caraway, cumin and dill. Each plant in this family has the umbrella-like flower clusters that characterize this family of plants. Carrots are a true vegetable, as they are not pollinated nor do they hold seeds within the fruit of the plant, like tomatoes, cucumbers and chile peppers, which are true fruits. Carrots are classified as a root vegetable, though the plant is comprised of a root, midribs and greens. Carrots are harvested at multiple stages of maturity while some cultivars are bread specifically to be harvested young or at full size. varieties that are specifically bred to reach their full size, as some varieties can get woody and produce a dry, threaded flesh
    • Carrots provide the highest content of vitamin A of all the vegetables. Brightly orange colored carrots contain the pigments known as carotenoids and flavonoids, two important phytochemicals and natural bioactive compounds found in plant foods that provide several
    • Carrots are one of the most common ingredients found in the kitchen as well as one of the most versatile and fundamental ingredients for culinary use in recipes both sweet and savory. Diced carrots, along with celery and onions are a key ingredient (known as mirepoix) in soup stocks and broths. While basic stocks and soups rarely achieve their well-rounded flavoring without a carrot, carrots fill many other recipes along with many other ingredients, included simple roasted vegetable medleys along with other winter root vegetables. Carrots are a quintessential ingredient in baked goods such as bread and muffins. Carrots are eaten raw in crudites, pureed into sauces, boiled and fried. Carrots pair well with almonds, bacon, butter, celery, cheeses, especially cheddar, parmesan and pecorino, cinnamon, cream, ginger, parsley, potatoes, mushrooms, shallots, tomatoes and vinegar, especially red and white wine. Carrots will keep in cool, dry storage for up to a month or more
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    • Celery can grow to optimal heights from 18″ to 24″. It has wide parsley-like green leaves and thick, juicy, ribbed stalks that join at a common base above the root. Celery, at its best, has a juicy and crunchy flesh with a mild salty flavor. Although celery is most often used for its stalks, its leaves are edible as well and have a concentrated celery-flavor
    • Celery is available year-round
    • The genetic base of the current North American varieties is narrow as they were derived from three European varieties introduced in the early 20th century
    • Celery is commonly used as an aromatic, or in mire poix bases, but should not be overlooked as a vegetable. Cook diced celery with onions or apples, potatoes and cream and puree into soup. Braise sliced celery in vegetable stock and wine, or bake with cream and cheese into a gratin. Combine raw celery slices with citrus segments and grains for a cold salad. Stuff 3-4 inch slices of celery with cheese or hummus for an appetizer. Store celery, head intact, in the refrigerator for 1-2 weeks
    • Celery, onions and bell peppers are the three vegetables considered to be the “holy trinity” of Louisiana Creole and Cajun cuisine
    • Native to the Mediterranean region and cultivated over three thousand years, celery is a biennial herbaceous plant of the Umbelliferae family, which also includes carrots, parsley, fennel, dill and anise. It is botanically named Apium graveolens. Its wild ancestor was called “smallage”, a bitter tasting marsh plant that was used primarily as a medicine. Celery was first recorded as a food plant in France in 1623